Blind Perthshire Teen is inspired to raise money for the NHS

Former Strathallan School pupil Will Kent (18) has titled his fundraiser ‘The Blind Celt Against COVID’, and has so far raised around £1500.

A blind Perthshire school-leaver has used his love of Celtic culture to raise money for the NHS.

Former Strathallan School pupil Will Kent (18) has titled his fundraiser ‘The Blind Celt Against COVID’, and has so far raised around £1500.

Will, who lost his sight at the age of nine because of Stargardt’s disease, invited people to support him earlier this month as he prepared to walk unaided up Castle Law, the 280 metre hill close to his home at Strathallan where there is a hillfort.

Perth and Kinross pupils could be taught in churches and community halls

Will explained that, while wearing the clothes in keeping with the Celtic times the site dates from, his mission would be to walk the seven mile route to the fort daily and recite his poetry inspired by the Celts.

He would blow his signalling horn and place a painted rock he had carried with him at the cairn at Castle Law’s summit.

William Kent

With early history his personal hobby, he discovered that in ancient times the blind were considered gifted at poetry and music, which is why Will felt he was the right person for the mission having previously won competition prizes for his writing.

“I am passionate about the Celts and ancient history and I am a poet,” he said. “Even though I am blind, I can do my bit.

Popular Highland Perthshire event is cancelled due to concerns over COVID-19

“I have benefited from the NHS throughout my life. I want to give back to it.”

NHS staff spent much time diagnosing his eye condition, fixing his teeth following an incident and performing numerous operations when Will was younger.

In summers past, Will has been a volunteer at the Scottish Crannog Centre on Loch Tay where volunteer guides wear woollen and woven clothing in keeping with the Iron Age theme of the visitor attraction.

Before beginning his challenge last week, the teenager described his unusual idea to attract sponsorship: “The route up Castle Law is seven miles long and the hill 280m high, and I will do this walk every day for a week as my lockdown exercise.

William Kent

With early history his personal hobby, he discovered that in ancient times the blind were considered gifted at poetry and music, which is why Will felt he was the right person for the mission having previously won competition prizes for his writing.

“I am passionate about the Celts and ancient history and I am a poet,” he said. “Even though I am blind, I can do my bit.

Popular Highland Perthshire event is cancelled due to concerns over COVID-19

“I have benefited from the NHS throughout my life. I want to give back to it.”

NHS staff spent much time diagnosing his eye condition, fixing his teeth following an incident and performing numerous operations when Will was younger.

In summers past, Will has been a volunteer at the Scottish Crannog Centre on Loch Tay where volunteer guides wear woollen and woven clothing in keeping with the Iron Age theme of the visitor attraction.

Before beginning his challenge last week, the teenager described his unusual idea to attract sponsorship: “The route up Castle Law is seven miles long and the hill 280m high, and I will do this walk every day for a week as my lockdown exercise.